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Posts Tagged ‘1911 census’

New transcription of 1901 census

Wednesday, 12th August, 2009

A brand new transcription of the 1901 census, complete with newly scanned high-quality images, is available on findmypast.com. They’ve just added the final 24 counties and other UK territories – which comprise over 5.6 million new records – so you can now search the census in full.

Search the complete 1901 census for England and Wales now

Although the 1901 census has been available for some time, they’re confident our new transcription is the most accurate online and will reveal many individuals whose names have been wrongly transcribed by other websites. And to make sure that they meet their commitment to providing you with the best quality images, all of the documents have been re-scanned.

If you’re unable to find your family on other versions of the 1901 census, then it’s well worth trying on findmypast.com.

The completion of the 1901 census brings findmypast.com a step closer to a full set of 1841-1901 England and Wales censuses. The 1851 census – the only remaining incomplete census – will be available in full within the next few months, and a full set of high-quality 1881 census images will be added to the transcriptions already available.

Free Access to 1911 Census for England & Wales

Friday, 31st July, 2009

Thousands of people across England and Wales will soon get the opportunity to delve into their family history online for free. The National Archives, in collaboration with UK-based family history website findmypast.com, is providing seven archives and libraries around England and Wales with free access to the recently completed online records of the 1911 census.

The census, available at 1911census.co.uk, provides a snapshot of life in the early 20th century, showing the name, age, place of birth, marital status and occupation of every resident in every home, as well as their relationship to the head of the household.

Oliver Morley, Director of Customer and Business Development at The National Archives, said: “The 1911 census has been hugely popular and we are excited to be able to help family historians across the country benefit from this fantastic resource.

“Digitising records allows a far greater audience to access them, and that is especially important with records like the census, which are extremely important for genealogists,’he added.

The seven institutions soon to launch free access to the census records are:

Before planning a trip, visitors are urged to contact the relevant institution to find out the when the service will be available.

The 1911 census is now complete

Tuesday, 23rd June, 2009

The final batch of records has now been added to the 1911 census, and includes the Channel Islands of Alderney, Guernsey, Jersey and Sark, and the Isle of Man.

They’ve also added records for around 135,000 soldiers based at 288 military establishments overseas, and around 36,000 naval personnel on 147 Royal Navy Ships overseas.

In 1911 the British Empire was nearing its peak and you can find soldiers and sailors located across the globe at remote outposts of the empire, as well as in other countries, such as Egypt, where Britain had a political and military presence but which were never formally part of the empire.

You will be able to search for army personnel who were stationed overseas, plus family members who went with them, as well as soldiers who were absent on the night of the census, and navy personnel who were onboard ship.

http://www.1911census.co.uk

All Welsh counties now available in 1911 census

Friday, 12th June, 2009

All 13 Welsh counties are now available on 1911census.co.uk:

  • Anglesey
  • Brecknockshire
  • Carnarvonshire
  • Cardiganshire
  • Carmarthenshire
  • Denbighshire
  • Flintshire
  • Glamorgan
  • Merionethshire
  • Montgomeryshire
  • Monmouthshire
  • Pembrokeshire
  • Radnorshire

These records contain a total of over 2.4 million individuals, and over a million households.

Search for your Welsh ancestors on the 1911 census now

Two languages

As the 1911 census is the first where household schedules were preserved, you will find that some of the census returns are printed and completed entirely in Welsh, while some are written in a mixture of Welsh and English. To help those who are not native Welsh speakers, there is a site section of useful tips, and translation tables to help you translate the most common Welsh census terms into English.

Common surnames and occupations

The tips will also help you narrow down your search results if you happen to have an ancestor with one of the most frequently occuring names, such as Jones or Evans, or one who worked in one of the dominant industries such as farming or coal mining.

Good luck with your Welsh research.

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